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Archizines and Public Offer

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Friday Feb 01, 2013 at 9:00am  to Wednesday Mar 27 at 5:00pm

Design Hub
RMIT Building 100
Carlton,   Melbourne
Victoria,   Australia   jump to map

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Designers in Melbourne have produced numerous publications since the mid-twentieth century. Public Offer aggregates these discussion platforms — zines, journals, blogs, apps, informal exchange circles, radio shows and podcasts — to look at how publishing has shaped conversations about the city and its design culture. Through this presentation (of fashion, architecture, industrial design, landscape architecture and graphic design), Public Offer prompts the questions: What do designers have to say? What can designers offer by being public? The assembled material in Public Offer is unpacked through several voices — makers, publishers, critics, writers and readers — that become an additional guide. These personal narratives are accompanied by a program of public activities including sports, evening drinks, roundtables, coffee breaks, workshops, beamer presentations and talks that will provide the social space that is vital for an exchange of ideas. Public Offer is a program of activities, an exhibition, a library and
 a partner to the touring exhibition Archizines, curated by Elias 
Redstone, while in Melbourne at RMIT Design Hub.

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ARCHIZINES is a critically acclaimed international touring exhibition celebrating the resurgence of alternative and independent architectural publishing around the world. Curated by Elias Redstone and initiated in collaboration with the Architectural Association, Archizines now features 90 architecture magazines, fanzines and journals from over twenty countries that provide an alternative to the established architectural press. Edited by architects, artists and students, these publications provide new platforms for commentary, criticism and research into the spaces we inhabit and the practice of architecture. They make an important and often radical addition to architectural discourse and demonstrate a residual love for print matter in the digital age.

The Age 01.02.13

 

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